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In these cases Trudeau signed a consent decree in which he did not plead guilty but did agree to stop making the claims and to pay a fine. Copper Fit Health Copper Fit compression sleeves help to reduce stiffness and soreness on your knees and elbows. Slim in 6 Slim in 6 will literally reshape your body in 6 short weeks. Court officials informed GIN members that the club's business model "likely amounted to an illegal pyramid scheme", and that its relentlessly publicized group of 30 billionaire financial advisors known as the "GIN Council" did not exist. In University of Calgary officials announced in a public statement that none of Trudeau's claims about the university's research were true, and that its attorneys had sent Trudeau a "cease and desist" letter, demanding that he stop associating himself with the school. Retrieved April 15,

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Trudeau's books claim that animals in the wild rarely develop degenerative conditions like cancer or Alzheimer's disease , and that many diseases are caused not by viruses or bacteria, but rather by an imbalance in vital energy.

Science writer Christopher Wanjek critiqued and rejected many of these claims in his July 25, LiveScience. His writing has been commercially successful if not factual. It has sold more than five million copies. Trudeau launched a self-titled Internet radio talk show in February which also aired on several small radio stations consisting of mostly brokered programming. Trudeau has been married at least three times.

Little is known about his first marriage, to Oleksandra Polozhentseva, a Ukrainian immigrant. His second union, in , to Kristine Dorow, a Norwegian student whom he met in London, ended in annulment after four months. In he married Natalya Babenko, another Ukrainian, who currently runs several of his former companies.

She has returned to her home in Kiev , according to Trudeau. In , Trudeau self-published his book Natural Cures "They" Don't Want You to Know About , in which he made a number of unsubstantiated claims—for example, that sunlight does not cause cancer, sunscreen is one of the major causes of skin cancer, and that AIDS was a hoax devised as an excuse to stimulate medication usage.

Natural Cures sold briskly due to an aggressive infomercial promotion. Quackwatch and other internet watchdog sites cautioned that the infomercial itself was "misleading". Santiago cautioned that Natural Cures contained no actual cures, only "speculation".

The paid sites contained only additional, similarly unsubstantiated speculation, according to the CPB. His second book was self-published as well and titled More Natural Cures Revealed: The book is a similar publication to his first, where he purports to explain why drug and food companies hide the truth about how their products can cause disease.

Though the book received negative comments from some reviewers, it received average ratings on both Amazon and GoodReads. The book describes a weight loss plan originally proposed by British endocrinologist ATW Simeons in the s involving injections of human chorionic gonadotropin. The diet was criticized in by the Journal of the American Medical Association as hazardous to human health and a waste of money.

Clinical research trials published by the Journal of the American Medical Association and the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition [31] have shown that hCG is ineffective as a weight-loss aid, citing "no statistically significant difference in the means of the two groups" and that hCG "does not appear to enhance the effectiveness of a rigidly imposed regimen for weight reduction.

The FTC has filed a contempt-of-court action against Trudeau alleging that the alleged misrepresentations in the book violate a consent order. Debt Cures was published in and has been marketed on television. Published in , the product says it gives tools on how to use the Law of Attraction to manifest readers' desires. The packaging also says it contains key links to using the Law of Attraction that are missing in other publications.

Among the claims made in the related infomercial is Trudeau's assertion to have virtually flunked out of high school. There is also an invitation to join the now defunct "Global Information Network," an "exclusive group of highly influential, affluent, and freedom-orientated [sic] people" see below. At one time, Trudeau was a prolific producer of infomercials. Trudeau offers a conspiracy theory , saying that the drug industry and the FDA work with each other to effectively deceive the public by banning all-natural cures in order to protect the profits of the drug industry.

In any other industry, according to Trudeau, this would be called "bribery," a "conflict of interest" or "payoffs. One of the major complaints about Trudeau's infomercials is that he makes only vague references to scientific studies, making them impossible to cross-check for accuracy.

The same criticism exists for the anecdotal evidence he presents in the infomercials. For example, he tells a story in an infomercial about "a friend from England" who came to his house and complained of heartburn. He also references a study done on the antidepressant qualities of St. John's Wort compared to two prescription medications. These studies, the informercials suggest, are identified in the book being advertised for sale, but none of his books provide any such substantiation.

A pair of Associated Press articles by Candice Choi on the infomercials elaborated on the success and problems of the programs. Trudeau's use of the word "cure" is an issue for regulators. Also, bookstores are polled on their decisions to sell or not sell a successful and controversial self-published book. Trudeau says he adapted techniques used to improve the memory of the blind and the mentally challenged to create Mega Memory and Advanced Mega Memory audio tapes.

His promotion of memory-enhancing products was ended by the intervention of the Federal Trade Commission which alleged that the claims made by Trudeau were false and programs involved would not enable users to achieve a " photographic memory ," as the advertising claimed. Trudeau used research that Dr. Trudeau was selling automobiles at Neponset Lincoln Mercury in the Dorchester neighborhood of Boston in when he first met Van Masters.

In addition to Natural Cures , Trudeau also hosted an infomercial that features the "Perfect Lift" non-surgical facelift. In , Trudeau began airing another infomercial, for a product called Firmalift, with Leigh Valentine. His goal was to transform billiards into a "major league" sport with aggressive promotion and the largest purses ever offered.

Winners were assured that they would receive their prizes in small installments, but most were never paid. The Reno fiasco marked the demise not only of IPT, but of professional pool competitions as a whole.

As one commentator put it, "The pool hustler wasn't murdered by any single suspect, but the last man holding the knife was Kevin Trudeau. In connection with his promotional activities he has had a felony conviction and has been an unsuccessful defendant in several Federal Trade Commission FTC lawsuits.

In these cases Trudeau signed a consent decree in which he did not plead guilty but did agree to stop making the claims and to pay a fine. Trudeau subsequently began to sell books, which are protected by the First Amendment.

Trudeau was convicted of fraud and larceny in the early s. The larceny he explains as a series of math errors compounded by the "mistake" of a bank official. As for why the bank thought he was a doctor, that was just a simple misunderstanding, because he jokingly referred to himself as a "doctor in memory".

He still can't quite believe he was prosecuted for the larceny charges. Trudeau began working for Nutrition For Life, a multi-level marketing program, in the mids. In , his recruitment practices were cited by the states of Illinois and Michigan , as well as the U. Securities and Exchange Commission. Illinois sued Trudeau and Jules Leib, his partner, accusing them of operating an illegal pyramid scheme.

Michigan forbade him from operating in the state. Callahan" was "studying quantum physics. In July , Trudeau entered into a stipulated preliminary injunction that prohibited him from continuing to make the challenged claims for Coral Calcium Supreme and Biotape. In the summer of , the court found Trudeau in contempt of court for violating the preliminary injunction, because he had sent out a direct mail piece and produced an infomercial making prohibited claims.

The court ordered Trudeau to cease all marketing for coral calcium products. He also agreed to a lifetime ban on promoting products using infomercials, but excluded restrictions to promote his books via infomercials.

District Court for the District of Columbia seeking declaratory and injunctive relief. Trudeau also filed a motion for preliminary injunction, which the court denied. The complaint charged that the FTC had retaliated against him for his criticism of the agency by issuing a press release that falsely characterized and intentionally and deliberately misrepresented the Final Order. The FTC responded with a motion to dismiss the complaint for lack of subject-matter jurisdiction under Federal Rule of Civil Procedure 12 b 1 , and for failure to state a claim for which relief can be granted under Rule 12 b 6.

The district court granted the FTC's motion to dismiss. First, the court concluded that it lacked subject-matter jurisdiction because the press release was not "a 'final agency action'" under "section of the [Administrative Procedure Act]", 5 U. Second, the court held, "in the alternative, that Trudeau's claims failed to state a viable cause of action as a matter of law.

Trudeau later filed an appeal which was unsuccessful in reversing the court's ruling. The temporary restraining order was replaced by a preliminary injunction. However, Trudeau lost a motion to have the Board send a "corrective letter" to the television stations and subsequently dropped all claims for monetary damages. The case is still in litigation. The FTC filed a contempt of court action against Trudeau and the companies that market The Weight Loss Cure 'They' Don't Want You to Know About , alleging that Trudeau was in contempt of a court order by "deceptively claiming in his infomercials that the book being advertised establishes a weight-loss protocol that is 'easy' to follow.

When consumers buy the book, they find it describes a complex plan that requires intense dieting, daily injections of a prescribed drug that is not easily obtainable, and lifelong dietary restrictions. On November 19, , Trudeau was found in contempt of the court order for "patently false" claims in his weight loss book. District Court Judge Robert W. Gettleman ruled that Trudeau "clearly misrepresents in his advertisements the difficulty of the diet described in his book, and by doing so, he has misled thousands of consumers.

The court denied Trudeau's request to reconsider or stay this ruling on December 11 of the same year. On February 11, , Trudeau was arrested and appeared in U. District Court before Gettleman for criminal contempt of court after he "asked his supporters to email the federal judge overseeing a pending civil case brought against him by the Federal Trade Commission.

That is, no one can touch him," Barrett said. On November 28, , the U. Food and Drug Administration and the Federal Trade Commission issued warnings to companies selling human chorionic gonadotropin HCG as weight loss products as the claims are unsupported.

In February , the court-appointed receiver announced that a number of Trudeau's known assets, including a home in Ojai, California , would be auctioned, with proceeds to be applied toward unpaid fines and restitutions. Court officials informed GIN members that the club's business model "likely amounted to an illegal pyramid scheme", and that its relentlessly publicized group of 30 billionaire financial advisors known as the "GIN Council" did not exist. GIN's remaining assets were later auctioned as well.

In March , Trudeau was sentenced to 10 years in prison, an "unusually lengthy" term for a contempt conviction. In April , Guzman ordered that royalties payable to Trudeau from continuing sales of his books—now owned by a California company called Free is My Favorite LLC, which purchased the rights from Trudeau—be forwarded to a government-controlled trust and used for fine and restitution payments.

One common criticism by consumer groups is that Trudeau has had no medical training. Trudeau responds that by not having such training, he is not biased toward pharmaceutical companies and the FDA, and that medical doctors "are taught only how to write out prescriptions" for "poisons" and "cut out pieces of a person's anatomy.

Trudeau has been criticized for his inability to provide evidence to back up his claims. Although he recites anecdotes, he has never provided evidence evaluated by licensed medical practitioners.

This was the accepted term for an infomercial from until "infomercial" came into vogue in The most common time period available for purchase as "long form" infomercial media is 28 minutes, 30 seconds in length. Long form is used for products that need to educate the consumer to create awareness and typically have a higher price.

A relatively small amount or media time may be purchased in lengths less than 30 minutes but more than 2 minutes. Five minutes is the most commonly available time of these lengths.

Direct response television campaigns are commonly managed by specialist Direct Response or DRTV agencies with a full range of strategic, creative, production, media, and campaign services. They may also be managed by media buying agencies who specialize in direct response. In either case, these agencies purchase two types of air-time in two ways.

The first is to purchase off of a station or broadcast network's rate-card for time. The second is to purchase remnant airtime, which is time that stations were not able to sell, and need to fill quickly or cheaply to avoid broadcasting dead-air. This is cheaper for agencies, but they have less control over when their commercials will run. As DRTV has gained presence outside of its start in the United States, local agencies have developed in many countries.

To qualify as DRTV, the advertising must ask the consumer to contact the advertiser directly by phone, by text message, or via the web. In the early days of DRTV, this was nearly always to purchase the product. Over time, a wide range of consumer actions have become used. And, many consumers watch the advertising but choose to purchase at retail without ever contacting the company.

Typically for every unit sold on TV, anywhere from 3 to as high as 15 units might be sold at retail depending on retail distribution. When it first appeared, DRTV was used to market goods and services directly from the manufacturer or wholesaler to the consumer, bypassing retail. Over time, it has also become used as a more general advertising medium and is now used by a wide range of companies often to support retail distribution.

Non-profit organizations also benefit from DRTV by making a direct appeal to viewers to make a donation [2]. Many types of companies use DRTV. Many of these items find their way to retail shelves once their television campaign has ended or has matured. Mass merchant retailers often have " as seen on TV " sections in their stores. Starting in the s, many brand manufacturers began to use DRTV as a part of their advertising mix.

In these cases, most products featured on DRTV are also available at retail. The DRTV campaigns ask for direct consumer action either to purchase the product or to obtain a coupon which they can use at the retail store.